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This nameless Czech woman meets with Philip to gain his assistance in writing a book about prostitution. The second Czech woman appearing later in Deception, a university educated translator and librarian, refused when asked to work for the Czechoslovak Secret Service.

She gets married to a poorly educated Englishman, leaves him to eventually fall in love with a married family man, and in short lives in England miserably. Olina leaves Ivan for a black man, but Ivan accuses Philip of having slept with his wife in the past. Philip describes his last visit to Czechoslovakia, particularly his experience of harassment from the Czech police in Prague who tried to detain him for questioning. He refused to cooperate and escaped them by public transportation. Although The Prague Orgy was first published in , it uses material from notebooks the author kept while visiting the Czech metropolis.

Since the Holocaust was in part a political or historical justification for the foundation of the State of Israel, most artistic presentations representing the Jewish victims of fascism were frowned upon by the anti-Zionist socialist regimes. The Diary of Anne Frank as an artistic and cultural expression of the Holocaust received particularly strong attention in an earlier novel by Philip Roth. In the far-fetched story line, Anne Frank is alive and living incognito in the United States because her fame as the embodiment of the many Jewish martyrs of the Nazi genocide would be lost if the true situation were known.

She had earlier intentionally burned her arm with an iron on the camp identification number that had been branded on her in Auschwitz the real Anne Frank arrived there, according to documents, on September 6, , but was transferred to the Bergen-Belsen camp in October and died there in early March, [4, pp. The drama is based on this book. In the s right-wing revisionists in the United States claimed that all of the elements of the drama were invented, rather than really written by Anne Frank.

The dramatization of The Diary was written by the team of Frances Goodman and Albert Hackett [6] and this stage adaptation, while based on the book The Diary of Anne Frank, includes changes to make Anne Frank appear less Jewish and more universal, in order to assure a non-Jewish audience and greater commercial success [5, p. The drama and the diary have the same title, resulting in additional confusion when court cases were filed in the s. For Roth, another off-putting aspect of the dramatized version of The Diary of Anne Frank was the dead victim thoroughly unrealistically speaking to us today, yet only through a dramatized version of edited excerpts from the real diary manuscript.

The statement is not justified by anything Anne actually told her diary. Roth indicates through his characters, including Amy Bellette, how cheap and sentimental this dramatization of The Diary was. This startling change in form still enables Kepesh to speak and hear, but he is blind. Metamorphosis and The Breast have in common narrators describing the shock, the sensations, and the acute fears of friends, acquaintances as well of colleagues from work discovering their startling change of form.

The Anatomy Lesson

Where is my face! Where are my arms! My legs! Where is my mouth! What happened to me! According to Earl J. Richards, who taught comparative literature at the same university as the fictional Kepesh in The Breast, the man Kepesh is based on is the Polish-born Shakespeare scholar Jan Kott [10, p. Although the plots of both The Breast and Metamorphosis are absurd in their own ways, both carry messages and speak to us. In contrast, The Breast offers an immediate sense of the comic, a mix of Yiddish humor with a feeling that a spoof of Sigmund Freud or psychoanalysis is behind the whole scheme.

Spielvogel, the man on duty is Dr. With Roth, the reader gets a good laugh, but that is not all. With Kafka, the metamorphosis of Gregor Samsa into a cockroach has already taken place at the start of the story, perhaps indicating what we are, or what perhaps Kafka felt himself to be. David Alan Kepesh, on the other hand, has become what every man ostensibly wants to have near himself, a comic Jewish wish fulfillment of a sort to be seen in Woody Allen films.

Both authors express a comic sense of the inner life of their particular time and culture. Roth plays with a Kafka motif and yet remains vintage Roth when Kepesh tells Dr. Klinger that turning into a breast was his way of becoming Kafka. I love the extreme in literature, idolized those who made it, was frustrated by its imagery and power and suggestiveness […] so I took the leap […] Beyond sublimation.

I made the word flesh. I have out-Kafkaed Kafka [12, pp. Like Roth, Kepesh is a great admirer of Kafka, and his great fantasy, as he interprets it, is only fulfilled through his own Kafkaesque metamorphosis.

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Remarkably, both had fathers named Herman and had less than ideal relationships with their fathers. Some people who have interviewed Roth noted the same photograph of year-old Kafka hanging both at his New York City apartment and his Connecticut home [11, p. If I had found it, believe me, I should have made no fuss and stuffed myself like you or anyone else. Skulls chiseled like this one were shoveled by the thousands from the ovens. Had he lived, his would have been among them, along with the skulls of his three younger sisters. Of course it is no more horrifying to think of Franz Kafka in Auschwitz than to think of anyone in Auschwitz — to paraphrase Tolstoy, it is just horrifying in its own way.

Roth points to twenty years in the future when he reflects on the appearance of the hunger artist and views the starved look of the Kafka face in the photograph, and connects them to the holocaust photographs and documentary films he saw as a child in the mids. Even better, the greatest fantasy a literary admirer can have: Roth brings Kafka to New Jersey — to his own school, even to his own home. The characters are not superior types, but rather the vulgar, standard American boys of Jewish ancestry who in show greater interest in playing baseball than allowing Dr.

Franz Kafka to teach them the Hebrew language at the synagogue. Nine-year-old Philip Roth is another fictional character in the story. In comes the new immigrant from Eastern European named Dr. Out of compassion for the poverty of the war refugee, Philip Roth invites Kafka to dinner with his family so that he can escape his isolation and confinement in the neglected part of town where he resides in a studio apartment. If not me, who? Can Dr.


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The thrill? The satisfaction? The pride? In spite of all that, Dr. Kafka later calls and invites Aunt Rhoda to see a movie. Roth has Kafka discover in Aunt Rhoda, just as he did in his last year of life, a certain untapped talent for drama and theatrical performance. Eventually, Kafka writes letters announcing the break up of the relationship, devastating Rhoda. In the end, Roth cannot allow Kafka to succeed even in his fantasy: Kafka remains isolated and fully alienated from the American society.

Kafka had been a patient there since He was 70 years old. Kafka was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, and was a refugee from the Nazis. Everything from and about Franz Kafka soon disappears and he becomes anonymous, not the Franz Kafka. Kafka in some ways appears to have been better off dying in Yet he transmits that message in the form of the Yiddish joke. Soon he becomes aware this also means being a gynecologist. Flying out out for an admission interview, he meets his female limo driver, Ricky, and pretends to be Milton Appel, a critic who has given him a bad review.

Appel's new identity is a pornographer with a magazine called Lickety Split. Soon he is enchanted by Ricky's stolidness. You know how many come there who actually fuck? Heavy traffic. Milton Appel was based on Irving Howe. Aug 23, R. Shelves: Well, no surprise: they are. Or at least this one is. Even the dialogue comes off sounding like he's sitting there at his typewriter, furiously talking to himself putting the anger into Zuckerman's voice, and the dissenting opinion into the voice of the Female Who Adores Him.

Your eyes just glide over the words; he seldom plays with the words, gets limber with the language though there is a definite muscular musicality. So, yes, the ease of it all is a plus And the man is considered America's finest writer, showered with praise. Even Joyce Carol Oates isn't this one-trick-pony-ish. She actually has, you know, pushed towards dark, albeit imaginary, corners much more the impulse of "a fine American writer". I mean, look at what Newsweek said: "It was bold of Roth to write a novel about being famous I think the past ten years of Internet have proven that writing about oneself is not bold, but a national compulsion that finds its greatest, boldest exponent in the writing of year-old girls on MySpace.

View all 4 comments. Oct 04, Daniel rated it really liked it Shelves: books-about-writers , It was arguably a mistake to read "The Anatomy Lesson" without first reading the previous two books in the Zuckerman series, but the third installment works fine on its own, especially if the reader has a working knowledge of Philip Roth's own history. One can easily mentally replace "Carnovsky," the book for which author Nathan Zuckerman became famous, with Roth's own "Portnoy's Complaint," and all becomes clear.

I read "Portnoy's Complaint" many, many years ago, but it's not a book one quickl It was arguably a mistake to read "The Anatomy Lesson" without first reading the previous two books in the Zuckerman series, but the third installment works fine on its own, especially if the reader has a working knowledge of Philip Roth's own history. I read "Portnoy's Complaint" many, many years ago, but it's not a book one quickly forgets. I've only read a handful of novels with passages as funny as those in "The Anatomy Lesson" in which Zuckerman poses as his rival Milton Appel, transforming him from a literary critic to a pornographer in order to verbally assault anyone who will listen -- and those who won't -- with long, detailed, profanity-filled descriptions of his completely made-up career as an adult-movie producer, men's magazine publisher and sex-club owner.

Those passages serve as a comic prelude to later scenes in which Zuckerman's misguided attempts to actually transform himself from a novelist to a doctor reach their downbeat but inevitable conclusion. For someone like me, who has read a handful of Roth books but never any of the Zuckerman novels, and wanted to see what they were like without committing to the whole series, "The Anatomy Lesson" turned out to be a good choice. I liked this but it was just too long. I enjoyed 'The Ghost Writer' and 'Zuckerman Unbound' because they were both short and easier to absorb.

This one is twice the length and that is twice as long as I wanted to spend in the poisonous world of Nathan Zuckerman. About halfway through I stopped caring about Zuckerman: I wished he would just go and kill himself so I could be finished with the story. But on it goes for another pages As usual with Roth, he lightens things up with some comic mo I liked this but it was just too long. As usual with Roth, he lightens things up with some comic moments that had me laughing out loud. The humour is hard-hitting and not to everyone's tastes. Perhaps the thing that I will remember most about this novel is the classic line expletives deleted : ''Yeah, you know what's going to be on the cover of the next magazine?

And no, if you didn't find that funny, you're not going to like this. I read that several times over to check that, yes, I had indeed read that correctly and yes, Zuckerman did just say that. You have to admire Roth's daring sometimes Up until the book's fifth act, it's typical Roth, typical Zuckerman in its themes and voice: sex, being Jewish in America, the politics of the 60s and 70s, relations with your family, the artist and his art and the public's confused entanglement of the two.

Then in the book's concluding chapter it becomes something else entirely, at first almost surreal then ending in an almost lyrical sweep through human suffering and mortality that is almost Greek tragedy in its catharsis and conclusion. Amazi Up until the book's fifth act, it's typical Roth, typical Zuckerman in its themes and voice: sex, being Jewish in America, the politics of the 60s and 70s, relations with your family, the artist and his art and the public's confused entanglement of the two.

May 17, Justin Evans rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. Far and away the most rewarding of the first three Zuckerman books. Is that because Roth is just a less cliched character as he gets older? I find that hard to believe. But it makes me wonder- if you're writing what is essentially autobiography, and you're committed to not lying, how hard is it to attain any artistic unity? Not sure Roth did it in the Ghost Writer or in Z. Unbound; here he manages a bit better. Maybe that's just because the Portrait of the Young Artist thing of GW is mind boggli Far and away the most rewarding of the first three Zuckerman books.

But here the really big topics are dealt with reasonably well: death, pain, guilt, escapism. You get some early Roth ranting, which is always fun; Roth feels emotional pain because of the ranting which is interesting; and Roth thinks a little ponderously about reflecting on his early ranting: "If you get out of yourself you can't be a writer because the personal ingredient is what gets you going, and if you hang on to the personal ingredient any longer you'll disappear right up your own asshole.

I'm not sure he overcame it, here or elsewhere, but this book seems to treat the problem in a comparatively dignified manner. Two catches: does Roth realize that the insane feminist-bashing he spews forth under the name of his nemesis is more or less replicated in The Human Stain?

And how will the schematic psychologizing will look in fifty years? It's already a bit frayed. Some critics approve of it 'if Z has a failed relationship at age 40, we remember his failed relationship at age 23, and his guilt over his mother at age 12' and so on , but I find it irritating; obviously I hope history supports my own impeccable feelings. Mar 26, Todd Charlton rated it it was amazing. In the first he was the young writer who has upset his family, in the second he is the celebrity who has pissed of the entire Jewish identity.

In this book, we see Nathan Zuckerman at his lowest ebb. He is in constant pain for no apparent reason and begins to believe he is being punished for his transgressions as a writer; so much so that he no longer wants to be who he is. He pretends at long stretches to be somebody else when in conversation with those who don't know him and he is addicted to booze and drugs, anything to check out for a while. Through it all however is Zuckerman's intense belief in what is right and worthy, seeking the truth, even from within a web of lies.

These passages toward the end of the book are astonishing in their rendering of what it is to be, not just human, but a human of substance. He meets an old friend who is a doctor and asks him what he has to do to leave writing and become a doctor himself. Bobby doesn't believe Nathan has the conviction or the knowledge at 40, to make it through medical school. One day Nathan takes a heavy fall in a drunken, drug fueled stupor and is seriously injured; here he comes to know what real pain is, he had no idea. Bobby shows Nathan the horrors of a doctor's life and we know that, despite his continued apparent enthusiasm, Zuckerman aint no doctor.

The Anatomy Lesson is written with gusto and integrity, honest and hilarious intensity by the much lauded Philip Roth.

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Like the handful of truly great writers, he found his niche, his own voice. It's displayed with every line of exquisite prose that flows from his masterful pen. May 25, Martin rated it it was ok. There are parts of the book that are worthy of four stars, but they were few and far between. As with the previous Zuckerman novels, it improved greatly as it progressed, but the first third of the novel I found incredibly tiresome.

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I hate it when authors have to respond to their critics within their books I found it petty when Tina Fey responded to internet commenters in 'Bossypants' as well , and having a literary alter ego respond to a fictional critic is one of the most trifling acts I can There are parts of the book that are worthy of four stars, but they were few and far between.

I hate it when authors have to respond to their critics within their books I found it petty when Tina Fey responded to internet commenters in 'Bossypants' as well , and having a literary alter ego respond to a fictional critic is one of the most trifling acts I can imagine in a novel. The voices of the male characters were practically indistinguishable to me, and I can't tell whether that is the fault of Roth or Zuckerman, but either way it's still the fault of Roth. The female characters were slightly distinct from each other, at least, though kind of nagging. Everyone's speechifying became so wearying, which Roth describes as "some enormous tube of linguistic paste.

Diatribe, alibi, anecdote, confession, expostulation, promotion, pedagogy, philosophy, assault, apologia, denunciation, a foaming confluence of passion and language, and all for an audience of one. View 1 comment. Feb 24, Christopher Saunders rated it liked it Shelves: reads. Philip Roth's The Anatomy Lesson begins with perennial Roth hero Nathan Zuckerman kvetching and moaning about how hard it is to date four women at once. Thus it's peak mid-career Roth, wondering why and how his dick dried up and how he can't possibly keep satisfying all these insatiable women while maintaining his own manhood.

The Prague Orgy - Philip Roth - Google Livres

It's easy to caricature Roth's work as an endless parade of onanism, mostly because books like this do it for you; sure, there's some navel-gazing about the pitfalls of su Philip Roth's The Anatomy Lesson begins with perennial Roth hero Nathan Zuckerman kvetching and moaning about how hard it is to date four women at once. It's easy to caricature Roth's work as an endless parade of onanism, mostly because books like this do it for you; sure, there's some navel-gazing about the pitfalls of success and the obligatory shots at Richard Nixon and other pet political hates, plus an ostensible device of Zuckerman's midlife crisis manifesting as literal physical pain, but they're overtaken by Roth's continued obsession with his own sexual prowess.


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  • Some find this amusing or charming or devastatingly self-aware; in Roth's better works, it can be. In books like this, it's childish, tiresome piffle. Nov 10, Krok Zero rated it liked it Shelves: fall As always, Roth's prose is breathtaking, and engaging every step of the way. But I'm getting awfully tired of whiny-ass Zuckerman. It's amazing how Roth keeps finding new ways to weave innumerable handsome sentences out of what are essentially the same three or four of Zuckerman's problems.

    The Prague Orgy

    I found it amusing that Zuck's big goal is to escape the solipsistic life of the novelist, while this novel— The Anatomy Lesson —is built entirely on a foundation of solipsism. Obviously Roth knows that, so I g As always, Roth's prose is breathtaking, and engaging every step of the way. Obviously Roth knows that, so I guess it's supposed to be funny, and it kind of is, but I was never sure to what degree Roth was in on the joke.

    Does he know how much the reader hates Zuckerman? Does it matter? Who knows. This trilogy was brilliant in its way, but I am taking a break from both Roth and Zuckerman for a while. I can only handle so much self-aware narcissism all at once. Zuckerman has what he calls a play-mat for his various congresses with women. As the story progresses, Zuckerman succumbs to numerous ailments, paranoias, and accidents. He pretends to be a porn mogul. He decides to go to medical school.

    These things fit together loosely — while listening to the audio, when I let my mind wander for a minute, the story seemed to have jumped to another episode. What always remained, though, is Zuckerman in some kind of physical or mental pain, working out ways to deal with it. As always, I enjoyed the writing. The story was quite a bit more bizarre than I was expecting, though. Apr 29, D rated it liked it Shelves: english. Another Zuckerman novel. Not the best but nevertheless very enjoyable.

    The ending leaves too many questions, in my opinion. Not Roth's best work but a prescient portrayal of pain medication addiction. Aug 19, Jayant Maini rated it it was amazing. Philip Roth is a master of comedy Absolutely brilliant!!! Jan 22, Ryan rated it really liked it. I continue to get sucked in by Roth -- a phrasing that Philip would indeed love, as I discover more and more his exploration of the themes of not only his Jewishness but that of sexuality.

    In general this book covers themes that his earlier works has as well, but what I'm really loving especially with the Zuckerman series is his method of playing around with the writer's mentality as Zuckerman the fictional writer explores his work and his art and its effect as a way of mirroring his own Ro I continue to get sucked in by Roth -- a phrasing that Philip would indeed love, as I discover more and more his exploration of the themes of not only his Jewishness but that of sexuality.

    In general this book covers themes that his earlier works has as well, but what I'm really loving especially with the Zuckerman series is his method of playing around with the writer's mentality as Zuckerman the fictional writer explores his work and his art and its effect as a way of mirroring his own Roth's exploration of art and its effect. As always Roth's sentences pop out of the page, and many sections are filled with humor and dramatic irony. You laugh when you aren't expecting it and you honestly have no idea where Roth is going to take his character.

    The major theme explored in this outing is pain -- Zuckerman's unexplainable pain -- and the character's methods of dealing with it as well as attempting to discover its origin. This storyline, I felt, tended to get a little old, but I loved where he took it in the 5th and final section, culminating in a wonderful cemetery scene as Zuckerman's conflict from the previous book in the series comes back in a completely and dramatically ironic fashion -- we see it, and our poor protagonist seems not to, as the final paragraph of the book closes.

    The final pages show us the greater meaning of the previous for which I'm glad, as I was beginning to wonder exactly what the were all about -- now it makes sense. This is why you don't ever stop reading a book half way through! We now see Roth's greater comment on the notion of empathy and the importance of which the writer must never underestimate or take for granted. There's a lot of Roth on my plate, but I'm really loving this Zuckerman series. I think I'm going to tackle "the epilogue" and The Counterlife and finish out the final trilogy of the series before starting up with his Roth Series or his Standalones.

    And I will say, that his satiric treatment of Zuckerman's "Carnovsky" -- a parody of Roth's own "Portnoy's Complaint" as his writer's controversial, pornographic money-maker -- makes the actual reading of Portnoy's ultimately worth it. It stands alone - you don't need to be familiar with the earlier books to understand Zuckerman or this story. Nathan Zuckerman has filled many pages of Philip Roth's novels over the decades.

    Whether or not he reflects any of Roth's own experiences as an author, Zuckerman is a fully developed character, and never more so than in The Anatomy Lesson. Here we're introduced to Zuckerman's chronic pain. He has visited numerous health professionals for answers and for treatment or cure and is told it is something he might just have to live with. It was nothing! This book will be very familiar to sufferers whose chronic pain has wreaked havoc on their lives.

    Zuckerman is in turns defeated, enraged, disbelieving. If only he can find the right doctor, the right drug, the right distraction, his pain will all melt away. What are all the ways of confronting chronic pain? You can suffer it. You can struggle against it. You can hate it. You can attempt to understand it. You can try running and if none of these techniques provide relief, percodan. If nothing else works then to hell with consciousness as the highest value: Drink vodka and take drugs. And so he does. If only he can escape his body perhaps he can escape its pain. Hillgartner gives Zuckerman a compelling, highly engaging narrative voice.

    This isn't really a review as much as much as my opportunity to reaffirm Malcolm Hillgartner as the best voice of Nathan Zuckerman. For all the fantastic performers who have narrated Philip Roth's novels, Hillgartner is my favourite. Philip Roth is among the greatest of the past generation of American authors and I'm so pleased that Blackstone Audio is making his novels accessible to audio readers. They've picked out the best of Roth's novels and paired them with an ideal narrator. This is a fantastic production and I highly recommend it. Mar 05, Jake Danishevsky rated it really liked it Shelves: own.

    Another excellent and mind twisting read from a well deserved author Philip Roth. The is definitely entertaining, but not as much a page turn as Zuckerman Unbound, but still a page turner. Now, with all the great plot and interesting page turning why does this book gets a 4 star, 1 star short from being perfect? I started reading this book just about the time when an old injury or a few started to inflame to the point when 3 doctors visits, X-rays, pain meds hard and soft didn't elevate the pres Another excellent and mind twisting read from a well deserved author Philip Roth.

    I started reading this book just about the time when an old injury or a few started to inflame to the point when 3 doctors visits, X-rays, pain meds hard and soft didn't elevate the pressure in the neck, back, shoulder blade and going down my right arm and at the end numbing two of my right hand fingers. It was intense, constant and very annoying limiting my work schedule, daily activities and complete non use of a right side of my body most of the time throughout.

    So, back to the back and 4 starts. There are people who, when in pain, absorb other people's pain and reading this novel intensified what I feel even more so. I was almost positive that even though my condition is completely isolated, I thought that if I get this mental inducer from pages of the pained Zukerman, I might actually feel better and it was within the ball park. I finished the book yesterday and today, even in some level of pain and some discomfort, I do feel a lot better, even without the meds. Read this book at your own risk, I am biased, because if you are not feeling well, remember what I said and what this novel does to the pain, mental and physical.

    Great book after all. May 11, Mike rated it really liked it Recommends it for: roth-zuckerman lovers. From what i understand, this first collection of zuckerman books continued with The Prague Orgy is more about the life of the artist and the writing process and the lows and highs of being a popular author. Contrary to this, the later zuck books actually expand from these themes and deal with characters other than zuckerman himself.

    Of these first three, i found zuckerman unbound to be the most entertaining to read. But it definitely did have some hilarious moments. Well, he'd turn the tables and tend to abnormalities in the discharge of theirs. Feb 15, Richard rated it really liked it. For the first half of the book, I thought this was going to be my favorite Zuckerman book.

    Nathan Zuckerman, put down by some serious pain that no one had been able to find the source of, stoops to the level of possibly letting happen what he'd been resisting through Zuckerman Unbound , and that was becoming his own character, Carnovsky. Like the previous book, Zuckerman still has some struggles with his fame, but some passages are LOL-funny.

    The extrmism and downright horniness of the writing be For the first half of the book, I thought this was going to be my favorite Zuckerman book. The extrmism and downright horniness of the writing becomes quite a joy for a while. Roth, as always, shows his flair for endings, but when Zuckerman starts planning for himself an entirely new career, the book starts to diffuse. There's a doddy old man to try to help lift the mood now and then, but overall the book takes a bit of a plunge for a hundred pages or so into the second half.

    Roth saves his effort with a wonderful eye for an ending scene, which brought back up my estimation, but the doledrum was unfortunate. Nov 06, Jeremy Allan rated it liked it Shelves: modern-and-contemporary-fiction. Do you pinch your arm to try to distract yourself from the pain of a stubbed toe? Warning: you may start to feel sympathetic pain if you set this book down midstream. It's as if Nathan Zuckerman will leave you alone only so long as you keep on with his narrative.

    Otherwise, he'll start to project his suffering on you, until you've finished the novel. My father says, "Roth can be an acquired taste. So, if you don't like Roth, fine Do you pinch your arm to try to distract yourself from the pain of a stubbed toe? So, if you don't like Roth, fine. The dilemmas of masculinity presented are interesting to me. If you do like Roth, I don't think this is amazing work from him, but maybe a comfortable bed to lie in when you want a book about good ol' detestable Zuck.

    I'm not Zuck. Kids mostly. But anyway, I'll read Roth and consider it samesies. Jan 12, Beverly rated it really liked it Shelves: literary. Nathan Zuckerman and his doppelganger Philip Roth have grown on me. While not exactly likable, Nathan at age 41 in this installment of the Zuckerman trilogy helped me to understand the method of Roth's fictions. They are totally centered in one single consciousness. I guess that should be obvious, but somehow the intensity of Nathan's ruminating and suffering here made the obvious hit me over the head. There was a funny section both ha ha and strange in this novel that showed how the novelist c Nathan Zuckerman and his doppelganger Philip Roth have grown on me.

    There was a funny section both ha ha and strange in this novel that showed how the novelist creates a character and the relationship between the character and the writer. Nathan pretends to be his archenemy, the critic Milton Appel, and pretends that Appel is a famous pornographer. He goes on for pages as this character, narrating his life to his driver. In the denouement, Nathan collapses in a graveyard and lands on a tombstone, the perfect conclusion to a mid life crisis. Jul 21, Bryan rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Beckett agonistes.

    Accurate title I don't really want to talk about it, and maybe it should have rated three stars for its lack of narrative cohesion